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Greenbyte Documentation

Power Factor (tan-phi)

The Power Factor (also called tan-phi) calculates the reactive power losses. It is similar to the cos-phi calculation but it involves reactive power and true power instead.

This calculation comes as two different signals. One for device Grid meter (Grid Meter Power factor (tan-phi)) and one for Production meters (GMS Power factor (tan-phi))

Producers in France must comply to:

Step 1: A signed agreement on production or consumption, usually production. If they do not comply with the production/consumption agreement they are fined all the volume in “opposition” based on a fixed price per kVARh. Then tan phi value does not have to be calculated.

Step 2: If the production/consumption agreement is correct (let’s say producing), then depending on the production level, either:

  • If the production is normal they must comply with the tan-phi range, usually [0;0.1]. If outside this range, they are fined based on a fixed price per kVARh. For example, one customer was fined 80k€ cumulated penalties since 2017 on 3 wind farms, so this is not an insignificant cost for them.

  • If the production is low, the reactive energy must be below a fixed value.

Note

For the sake of the penalties, these calculations are done monthly.

Power_Factor__tan-φ__-_Description.png
Technology

Both

Remarks

N/A

Equation
Power_Factor__tan-φ__-_Equation.png

Where:

tan ø

is the Power Factor

Ere

is the Reactive Energy Export (for grid meter or GMS meter)

Eri

is the Reactive Energy Import (for grid meter or GMS meter)

Enet

is the Net Energy

Enet,grid

is the Grid Meter Net Energy

Enet,GMS

is the GMS Meter Net Energy

Inputs
Power_Factor__tan-φ__-_Inputs.png
Usage Example

The following usage examples show the relation between power and reactive power as well as power factors cos-phi and tan-phi:

Power_Factor__tan-φ__-_Usage_Example_1.png
Power_Factor__tan-φ__-_Usage_Example_2.png